“Cycle Revolution” at the Design Museum

Phil L writes:

Last week whilst in London I visited a cycle exhibition – called “Cycle Revolution” – at the Design Museum and have to say it’s a great exhibition, well worth going to see if you are down that way.  If you aren’t familiar with its location, it’s not far from Tower Hill or London Bridge tube stations.  Check it out on the Design Museum’s website or read this article in the Guardian.  It’s on until 30 June 2016.  If you travel in by train, the exhibition features in the 2-for-1 ticket concession.  If you go on your own, there are plenty of discounts on the admission price on the usual cycling websites.

Here’s a synopsis of the show which aims to celebrate the diversity of contemporary cycling in Britain from every-day commuting to Olympic-level competition and to look at where design and innovation may take the riders of the future.

The bikes on display include:

  • Bradley Wiggins’s 2015 Hour-Record bike and 2014 World Championship Time Trial bike
  • Bikes and other kit and equipment from Chris Froome’s 2015 Tour de France victory
  • Chris Hoy’s 2012 Olympic Track bike
  • The Mike Burrows bike ridden by Chris Boardman at the 1992 Barcelona Olympic Games
  • Eddy Merckx’s 1972 Hour-Record bike
  • Francesco Moser’s 1984 Hour-Record bike
  • The earliest existing prototype Brompton
  • A 1978 Breezer Series 1
  • A 1969 Raleigh Chopper.

There’s a builder’s workshop – showing the tools and materials that create a bespoke machine.  Six independent British bike builders are profiled – Donhou Bicycles, Toad Custom Cycles, Hartley Cycles, Robin Mather Cycles, Mercian Cycles and Shand Cycles.

High profile cyclists including Norman Foster and Paul Smith discuss their passion for cycling and hopes for its future in a film.

Social evening – Tuesday 1st July – “Pantani: Accidental Death of a Cyclist”

Next Tuesday is a social evening!

The Forum Cinema is showing “Pantani: Accidental Death of a Cyclist”.

Marco Pantani - Il Pirato

Marco Pantani – Il Pirato

Here’s what the puff says: “Marco Pantani, the most flamboyant and popular cyclist of his era, won both the Tour de France and the Giro d’Italia in 1998 – a titanic feat of mental and physical endurance that no rider has achieved since. He was a hero to millions – the saviour of cycling following the doping scandals which threatened to destroy the sport. Less than six years later, aged just 34, he died alone in a cheap Italian hotel room. The film explores the startling truth behind one man’s descent from being among the finest athletes on earth to a tragic end in a sport riven by intrigue. Combining scintillating race archive with contemporary news footage, stylised reconstructions and interviews with Pantaini’s family, friends, colleagues and rivals, including Bradley Wiggins, Evgeni Berzin and Greg LeMond. The story of the greatest climber of his generation, man vs mountain, athlete vs the system, Marco Pantani vs himself!” It’s a British film, directed by James Erskine.

The cinema is part of the Lings Forum Leisure Centre off Billing Brook Road at NN3 8JR. May I suggest we meet in the foyer at 7.45 p.m.? Last time (for the Armstrong film in April) the attendants locked any bikes in their office. Many bus services from the town centre stop in Billing Brook Road outside the Leisure Centre. There is a small car park but you’d probably be better parking in the large shopping centre car park on the other side of the road.

The running time is 1 hr 36 mins. Afterwards, we could enjoy a drink at “The Bold Dragoon” in Weston Favell Village (48 High Street, NN3 3JW) where bikes can be left at the rear. It’s the nearest pub with good ales (e.g. Timothy Taylor’s) to the cinema.

Any questions? Want to let me know you’re coming? I’m on 07960 302095!

Ian M

Two views on Sir Bradley

One of our members, David, subscribes to the conventional view and writes:

Sir Bradley Wiggins receives Knighthood following Tour de France Victory, Olympic Time Trial Gold Medal and Sports Personality of the Year 2012.

Sir Bradley Wiggins described receiving a Knighthood in the New Year Honours List as “incredible” but said he would not be using the title on a day-to-day basis.

“In terms of recognition and an accolade, as a sportsman in this country it’s probably the highest honour. I may get used to it over time, and I’ll probably use it in a very comedy way but not in a serious way. I certainly won’t be taking myself too seriously with it, that’s for sure,” said the 32-year old cyclist.

I take a different view:

I’ll try (!) to leave my political view – that “honours” replicate a Ruritanian view of the past – to one side and ask, “What’s the point?”

A highly-paid professional sportsman wins a gruelling cycle race and is awarded the Maillot Jaune – hurrah!  Great!  Brilliant!  I love it.

He goes on to win the Olympic Time Trial gold medal.  Hurrah!  Great!  Brilliant!  I love it and I was standing about 50 metres from the finish line.

I couldn’t tell you who won the gold medal at Beijing just four years ago.  Or any of the earlier winners.

Sports Personality of the Year?  What’s the point?  And a “knighthood”?  What’s the point?

Aren’t the Yellow Jersey and the Gold Medal enough?

 

Bradley Wiggins & Paul Weller – two DJs

I’m grateful to our member “Cycling Pete” who sent me this link (that he’d received from the Edinburgh Bicycle Co-Op):

Olympic gold medallist and Tour de France champion Bradley Wiggins joins musical hero Paul Weller for a two-hour special on BBC 6 Music.

In a meeting of minds, the self-confessed mod and the “Modfather” share anecdotes and their love of music in a programme that will be broadcast from 13:00 GMT on Boxing Day.

Wiggins, voted the BBC’s Sports Personality of the Year on Sunday, recalls his school days and pretending to be Liam Gallagher. He also talks stick-on sideburns and plays down his chances of a knighthood.

Details and a short video clip here